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Family Group Sheet


Husband:   John Howard Thompson

Born:   12 Nov 1802 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   26 Oct 1889 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Father:   Ebenezer Thompson (1778-1865)
Mother:   Elizabeth Howard (1783-1813)

1st Wife:   Dorcas Elliott

Married:   20 Aug 1822 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Born:   Abt 1803 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   09 Nov 1830 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Father:   Reuben Elliott (1781-1850)
Mother:   Charlotte Ann Strother (1783-1832)

CHILDREN

1   M       Name:   Ebenezer Thompson
Born:   22 Jun 1823 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   08 Dec 1896 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Married:   04 Mar 1845 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Spouse:   Permilia Blair
Born:   02 Nov 1826 in:   OH
Died:   25 Sep 1849 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Children:   John Howard Thompson (1846-1910) m. Emily Shafer (1847-1875) m. Elvira Jones (1849-1897) m. Lydia Ware
Mary Jane Thompson (1848-1883) m. Philip Henry Shafer (1846-1925)
Married:   06 Jan 1850 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Spouse:   Mary Ann Richards
Born:   02 Dec 1825 in:   Preble Co., OH
Died:   13 Apr 1906 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Children:   Ezra C Thompson (1851-1937) m. Mary Emily Chopson (1854-1936)
George Howard Thompson (1852-1925) m. Armitta Angeline Fix (1861-1921)
Lewis E Thompson (1854-1935) m. Malinda Benson (1860-1943)
Lucretia Thompson (1856-1920) never married
Byron E Thompson (1858-1933) m. Mary Ellen Colbert (1864-1927)
Permila Anna Thompson (1861-1901) m. John Robert Stinson (1862-1941)
James R Thompson (1863-1866)
Alice Dorcas Thompson (1865-1899) m. William Wiley Stinson (1861-1931)

2   M       Name:   Elijah Howard Thompson
Born:   12 Jul 1825 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   12 Feb 1899 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Married:   08 Oct 1848 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Spouse:   Mary Bailey Harris
Born:   09 Aug 1830 in:   KY
Died:   09 Jul 1916 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Children:   Angiline Thompson (1849-1922) m. Charles Andrew Richie (1845-1922)
Martha Frances Thompson (1851-1922) m. George Washington Ritchie (1849-1933)
Thomas Henry Thompson (1853-1920) m. Alice Lovell m. Mary C Moran
John William Thompson (1860-1892) m. Sadie Sammons (1859-1893)
Mary Parthenia Thompson (1863-1919) m. Henry Adam Sheeler (1853-1921)
James Robert Thompson (1866-1940) m. Kittie Knight (1868-1947)
Jepson Thompson (1866-1866)
Elijah Howard Thompson (1869-1942) m. Kate Ormes (1873-1949) m. Sadie Sammons Thompson (1859-1893)

3   M       Name:   George S Thompson
Born:   05 Jan 1828 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   10 Feb 1887 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Married:   10 Aug 1851 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Spouse:   Lydia A Helton
Born:   07 May 1832 in:   Randolph Co., NC
Died:   21 Nov 1894 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Children:   Mary Alice Thompson (1851-1929) m. Joseph L Jackson (1849-1914)
Melissa Jane Thompson (1853-1934) m. William Sheets (1848-1926)
Richard R Thompson (1858-1890) m. Armina Isabel Creviston (1863-1951)
Anne E Thompson (1860-1900) m. John E Wilmore (1858-1941)
Dorcas Thompson (1862-1902) m. William McCallister (1859-1903)
Alfred M Thompson (1867-1955) m. Delcenia Roberts (1863-1941)
William Howard Thompson (1871-1942) m. Elizabeth E Grover (1880-1975)
Susan Alice Thompson (1872-1887)
Lydia Belle Thompson (1875-1923)

4   M       Name:   John Howard Thompson, Jr. (1830-1910)
Spouse:   Lucretia Pribble (1831-1899)

2nd Wife:   Mary Thompson

Married:   23 Jun 1832 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Born:   20 Feb 1807 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   02 Feb 1880 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Father:   James Thompson (1768-1856)
Mother:   Mary Phillips (1774-1858)

CHILDREN

1   F       Name:   Margaret A Thompson
Born:   03 Oct 1833 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   20 Aug 1901 in:   Huntington Co., IN

2   F       Name:   Susan Thompson
Born:   20 May 1835 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   29 Sep 1894 in:  
Married:   31 May 1854 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Spouse:   Franklin Shaffer
Born:   1830 in:   OH
Died:   in:  
Children:   Rose Ella Shaffer (1857-) m. Joseph Taylor (1848-1918) m. James Williams
Lizzi Shaffer (1859-1861)
Ann Shaffer (1864-1864)
Alfred Shaffer (1866-1866)
Lovilla Shaffer (1868-1868)
infant son Shaffer (1869-1869)
John Shaffer (1874-1874)
Mary Shaffer (1877-1877)

3   M       Name:   Robert H Thompson
Born:   10 Jan 1840 in:   Bracken Co., KY
Died:   04 Jul 1929 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Married:   20 Feb 1867 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Spouse:   Louise C Stroup
Born:   Mar 1849 in:   IN
Died:   20 Sep 1910 in:   Wells Co., IN
Children:   Laura G Thompson (1868-)
Ernest Eliza Thompson (1869-1946) m. Etta M Burman (1872-1958)
Alfred P Thompson (1871-1954) m. Martha E Howard (1872-1958)
Anna M Thompson (1873-) m. Frank Wilmore
Arman E Thompson (1875-1893)
Robert M Thompson (1876-1876)
John J Thompson (1878-1903) m. Ida Jones
Married:   in:  
Spouse:   Belle Adams
Born:   in:  
Died:   in:  

4   F       Name:   Mary P Thompson
Born:   21 Nov 1841 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Died:   05 Apr 1925 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Married:   21 Feb 1867 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Spouse:   William Franklin Swaim
Born:   16 Mar 1843 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Died:   18 Jan 1917 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Children:   Fred E Swaim (1869-1952) m. Amelia Irvin (1870-1906)

5   M       Name:   James Thompson
Born:   1844 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Died:   15 Jun 1863 in:   Battle of Stone River, Murfreesboro, TN

6   F       Name:   Nancy Ann Thompson
Born:   22 Dec 1846 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Died:   05 Mar 1931 in:   Bluffton, Wells Co., IN
Married:   26 Sep 1872 in:  
Spouse:   Lewis C Mills
Born:   30 Mar 1848 in:   Fairfield Co., OH
Died:   17 Jan 1924 in:   Bluffton, Wells Co., IN
Children:   Mary J Mills
Ella Mae Mills (1874-1951) m. Oris B Lewis (1869-1940)
Josephine Mills (1876-1961) m. Frank Gordon (1876-1953)

7   M       Name:   William E Thompson
Born:   Abt 1848 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Died:   Abt 1848 in:   Huntington Co., IN

8   M       Name:   Alfred P Thompson
Born:   11 Feb 1849 in:   Huntington Co., IN
Died:   06 Jun 1874 in:  

Biography and Timeline


From Huntington County, Indiana History & Families 1834-1993:

JOHN HOWARD THOMPSON SR. - During the first 60 years of the history of Salamonie Twp. three men, each named John Howard Thompson, became influential citizens of the community. They were father, son, and grandson. The first of the name was a son of the Ebenezer Thompson II, the founder of the family in this county. The records in the office of the county recorder at Huntington show that Ebenezer II acquired a tract of 160 acres of land in Section 13, Salamonie Twp. in 1837. He moved to the land some time later, but then moved to Huntington Twp. where he built his mill on Little River. In a very short time, Ebenezer's son John Howard Sr. moved his family here from Kentucky. A history of Huntington County published in 1887 has the following to say about him.

"In September of 1840, John Sr. disposed of most of his property in Kentucky at public auction, loaded a four horse wagon with their personal effects and with his wife and seven children started overland for this county. He had to pass through some very broken country and was some weeks in making the trip. About the first of October 1840, he unloaded his wagon in Section 13, Salamonie Twp. The Miami Indians had chosen a desirable spot on this tract for a camp and had erected a large wigwam, which Mr. Thompson tore down and put up a log cabin instead. Into this he moved his family and set out to hew a home out of the forest. Many is the night he and his sons spent in burning brush and log heaps after a long day's work in clearing.

John Howard was born in Bracken County, KY on Nov. 12, 1802. He married Dorcas Elliott on Aug. 20, 1822. To them were born four sons: Ebenezer III, Elijah who remained in Kentucky, George S. and John Howard Jr. Dorcas doed Nov. 9, 1830. He then married Mary Thompson in June 1832. Eight children were born to this marriage being Margaret, Ann, Susan, Wm. E., Robert H., Mary P., James, Nancy, and Alfred P., making a family of 12 in all. Eight of them survived their father when he died Oct. 26, 1889 at the age of 86 years. Funeral services were held at the Christian Church with burial in the Thompson Cemetery.


From History of Huntington County, Indiana, 1887, pages 843-844:

JOHN H. THOMPSON, Sr. - Prominent among those who have aided in developing this township, is John H. Thompson, Sr. He is now enjoying his eighty-fourth year and has been a resident of Salamonie Township forty-seven years. He was born in Bracken County, Ky., November 12, 1802. His parents Ebenezer and Elizabeth (Howard) Thompson were natives of Virginia. Our subject was reared amid the hardships of farm life. In August, 1821, he was united in marriage with Miss Dorcas Elliott; to this union were born four sons, namely: Ebenezer, Elijah, George and Howard, all of whom are now living. Mrs. Thompson, the loving wife and mother, was called away in 1831. Mr. Thompson was again married in 1832, to Mary Thompson, by whom he was blessed with eight children: Margaret, Susan, Mary, Ann, Robert, William E., James and Alfred, of whom William E., Alfred and James, are deceased. Mrs. Thompson, the mother of these children was also called away in 1878, since which time Mr. Thompson and his daughter Margaret, have resided together in Warren. Ebenezer Thompson, the father of our subject, settled in Salamonie Township in 1839. During the next year, or in September, 1840, John disposed of the most of his property in Kentucky, at public auction, loaded a four horse wagon with a few personal effects, and with his wife and seven children started over-land for this county. He had to pass through some very broken county and was some weeks in making the trip. But he never lost his courage, and about the 1st of October, 1840, he unloaded his wagon on the northwest quarter of Section 13, Salamonie Township. There was not a stick amiss on his land. The Miami Indians had chosen a desirable spot on this tract for a camp, and had erected a large wigwam, which Mr. Thompson tore down and put up a log cabin instead. Into this, he moved his family, and set out to hew a home out of the forest. And many is the night he and his sons spent in burning brush and log-heaps after a hard day's work in the clearing. Thus by degrees he cleared up his farm and provided himself and family with a comfortable home. He started in life a poor, but honest man, and the first twenty years of his married life he passed in Kentucky, merely supporting his family, and it was some years after he emigrated to this county before he began to realize the fruits of his labors. By honest toil, and fair dealing he accumulated considerable of wealth, which he has generously divided between his children. The pioneers are fast fading away, and the time is almost here when all who were identified with the development of this county will have passed away. Our venerable subject who is now over eighty-four years of age, who came here when all was in the woods and has lived to witness the great change brought about by the settling up of the wilderness of fifty years ago, will ere long be called home. But he has made his mark in the world. He has led an honorable Christian life, and set an example to his sons and daughters. He united with the Campbellite Church in 1840, and has followed the path of a Christian ever since. He has always been ready and willing to assist any enterprise of a Christian or benevolent character. He expects to end his days in his comfortable home in Warren.


From Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County, 1901, pages 417-420:

Kentucky has contributed to Indiana many prominent families of the class of pioneers who followed Boone into that region and were specially suited to the needs of the new country north of the Ohio river. Many of the men who crossed the river to found new homes for themselves were determined largely by the absence of that curse of any country--slavery.

Bracken county, Kentucky, was filled with a peculiarly rugged class of citizens, their hardihood and perseverance making them well qualified to take up the responsibilities of felling the forests that covered all this region. Probably the state at the south never contributed a family whose members have done more to develop Indiana than has the Thompson family, whose earlier representatives were as hardy and vigorous a race of men as ever crossed the river, and whose numerous representatives of to-day are counted among the most active and progressive men of the county. While the space that can be devoted to a single article precludes an expansive treatment of all the prominent members of this family, several distinct reviews of its various representatives will be found in this volume. In dwelling somewhat upon the life of the man whose name introduces this article, we will also speak at some length of his father, Ebenezer Thompson, and in doing so will carry the reader back two generations further into the family genealogy, directing attention for a moment to another Ebenezer Thompson whose birth is traced to Virginia, where the distinctness of the line becomes obscured, though it is almost certain that the origin of the family in this country dates back to a time considerably anterior to the revolutionary period, and that the family was ably represented on the side of the colonists in the struggle. It is known that his wife, a Virginia lady, was Elizabeth Howard, a name that has been faithfully handed down through the succeeding generations, no less than a half-dozen of the family bearing that designation at the present time. This man was of the adventurous race of men who delighted in the life of the frontier, and who were as necessary to the future settlement and making of a new country as were those who succeeded them in taking up the work they had begun.

Many of this class of brave frontiersmen followed Boone into the country west of the Mississippi, but Ebenezer Thompson had his attention directed northward toward the close of the eighteenth century; he had gone into the Kentucky country when it was well named "the dark and bloody ground," being found there previous to the opening of the nineteenth century, residing there until that section of the state became somewhat settled up, and, feeling himself somewhat crowded, looked about "to find new worlds to conquer." His gaze rested upon the valley of the Salamonie, and in 1839, but six years after the first cabin was built on its banks, he is here found at a time in life when most men are content to let well enough alone and drop into the "sere and yellow leaf." Seeing what he deemed a more promising country in the valley of Little river, he finally settled near where Huntington now stands, making that his permanent home, and where he died, rich in years and experience.

His first wife, Elizabeth Howard, was the mother of three sons: George, John Howard and William, the latter remaining in Kentucky, while the other two came to this county. George was the father of Senator George Howard Thompson, of whom further mention will be made; and John Howard became one of the most prominent men of Salamonie township, and who was the grandfather of the one whose name heads this review. He was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, November 12, 1802, and died at the age of eighty-five. A more detailed record of his life will be found in another relation, our attention being directed at present to his eldest son, Ebenezer, whose mother was Dorcas Elliott, and who was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, June 22, 1824, being sixteen years old upon accompanying his father to Huntington county in the fall of 1840, the journey being made during the most heated political campaign this country has ever known, that of "Tippecanoe and Tyler, too." He was accustomed to the hardest manual labor from his tenderest years, and it seemed no hardship for him to devote his energies to assisting his father in clearing, burning brush, ditching and all the heavy work incident to the opening of a new home in the midst of a heavily timbered country. When still a young man he was married to Miss Permelia Blair, whose parents, George and Jane (Keyser) Blair, had brought her as a child from Ohio about the same time of the coming of his parents. Her father died quite young, and her mother then became the wife of Ezra C. Thompson, who came from another line of the widely distributed Thompson family, and survived until some twenty years since. Permelia was not, however, allowed to remain the companion and comfort of her husband and family for long, as her death occurred September 25, 1849, and her body was the first deposited in what became known as the "Thompson" cemetery, in the eastern part of the township, and many of the name have been laid there since. She was the mother of two children, of whom our subject, who was born January 28, 1846, was one; the other was Mary Jane, who became the wife of Philip Shafer, and died at thirty years of age.

The successor to the lady above mentioned was Mary Richards, who still resides on the old homestead, which is operated by one of her sons. She was the mother of eight children, seven arriving at maturity and six living at the present writing. Ebenezer Thompson began his farming in a small way, having but forty acres of land, but, with the ambition and energy characteristic of the family, he kept adding until his farm contained upward of three hundred acres, highly improved, and became one of the most valuable estates in the community. He was one of those advanced farmers who delight to have his business kept in fine condition, the improvements that he placed upon the farm speaking forcibly of his capacity as a shrewd, sagacious citizen. The original house is still in use, having been incorporated into the present one, his whole business life being passed on the spot where he died, in December, 1896, in his seventy-third year. The "dark messenger" gave no warning, but, as the flash of lightning from a clear sky, laid his hand upon the brow of this old and respected pioneer and called him to the last rest.

All the early years of John H. Thompson were passed on the farm with his father, his personal operations dating from his twenty-second year, when his father gave him a piece of wild land, upon which he began to hew out a farm for himself, taking about one year thereafter, as a helpmate and companion, Miss Emily Shafer, whose brother Philip had married his sister. After five or six years on this first tract he made some change, having, while he continued to cultivate the soil, owned several farms, finally settling on a desirable one in section 21, where he remained until retiring to the village, upward of twenty years since, though he has continued to retain his interests in agriculture. His farm of two hundred and forty acres lies one mile east of Warren, the principal feature of his operations being the keeping and handling of stock. Having taken a keen interest in the political history and progress of the country, his relations have been with the Republican party, and, though never striving for public preferment, was chosen as the trustee of Salamonie township, in which position he served the people most acceptably during a period of four years, and at a time when many of the public improvements were being placed, his own position regarding them being to advance the development of the country as fast as consistent with the financial conditions of the times. Not quite six years after marriage he was deprived of the assistance and co-operation of a valuable helpmeet in the death of his wife, her place being taken, the following year, by Miss Elvira E. Jones, daughter of Silas and Eliza Jones and granddaughter of the original pioneer of the township, Samuel Jones, whose efforts in settling and developing this section of the county far surpassed those of any other man. This lady was a charming companion and valued counselor, and for twenty-one years the course of life seemed to pass in a placid and undisturbed stream, when the summons to join the hosts who have gone before came to her, and she, too, passed from earth on the 13th of December, 1897. The present mistress of the home, to whom he was married December 3, 1899, was Mrs. Lydia E. Ware, the widow of Johnson W. Ware, and the daughter of Harrison and Elizabeth (Rogers) Lynn, who was born in Jefferson township, a short distance west of Warren. Her father was born in Brooke county, West Virginia, came to Franklin county as a boy and to Huntington county in 1845. He has resided in Jefferson township ever since, having cleared and improved quite a farm, and is now passing the evening of life with his daughter. One son, Alvin D., now of Seattle, was the only child by the first marriage; the second resulted in the birth of three, the eldest, Sylvia M., being the wife of W. L. Reedy, and living at Bloomington, Illinois, was graduated at the Warren high school, and is in many respects a bright and promising young woman; Silas E. is a student in the high school; and Beulah M. is the youngest, being a delightful miss of ten. Mrs. Thompson, whose former husband was a well known and successful marble dealer, has two daughters: Flora M. being the wife of Thomas Bonafield, the popular druggist of Warren; and Effie, who married one of the oil operators of Warren,--James A. Siferd. The Thompson home is one of the most pleasant in the town, its hospitality being proverbial. She holds to the Methodist, while he retains relation to the Christian church, and is also a Mason.


Timeline:

  Date:   Place:   Event:
  1802   KY, Bracken Co.   Birth: John
  1803   KY, Bracken Co.   Birth: Dorcus
  1822   KY, Bracken Co.   Marriage: John and Dorcus
  1830   KY, Bracken Co.   Census: John (age 20-29) and female (age 20-29)
  1830   KY, Bracken Co.   Death: Dorcus
  1832   KY, Bracken Co.   Marriage: John and Mary
  1837   IN, Huntington Co.   Land: William Thompson purchases land for John
  1840   KY, Bracken Co.   Census: John (age 30-39) and female (age 20-29)
  1850   IN, Huntington Co.   Census: John (age 48) farmer, Mary (age 44)
  1860   IN, Huntington Co.   Census: John (age 58) farmer, Mary (age 51)
  1870   IN, Huntington Co.   Census: John (age 67) farmer, Mary (age 61)
  1880   IN, Huntington Co.   Death: Mary
  1880   IN, Huntington Co., Warren   Census: John (age 77) widowed and retired
  1889   IN, Huntington Co.   Death: John

Family Photos


John


John H. Thompson



Ebenezer and family
Back: Lucretia, Byron, Permilia Anna
Front: Ebenezer (oldest son of John and Dorcas), Mary Ann, Alice

George and Lydia
George (son of John and Dorcas) and Lydia


Robert Thompson
Robert Thompson (son of John and Mary)
served in Civil War

James Thompson
James Thompson (son of John and Mary)
died in Civil War

Alfred Thompson
Alfred P. Thompson (son of John and Mary)

Birth Records


 

 

Marriage Records


1822 Bracken Co., KY marriage record, Ebenezer authorizing marriage license for John H Thompson and Dorcas Elliott (from FamilySearch.org):

Marriage record

1822 Bracken Co., KY marriage record for John H Thompson and Dorcas Elliott (from FamilySearch.org):

Marriage record

Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850: (Ancestry.com)

Spouse 1: Elliott, Dorcas
Spouse 2: Thompson, John H.
Marriage Date: 20 Aug 1822
Marriage Location: Kentucky, Bracken County


Bracken County, Kentucky marriage record, book 1, p. 127:

marriage record


Bracken County, Kentucky marriage record, book 1, p. 129:

marriage record

Death Records


headstone


John H. Thompson Sr.
Died
Oct. 26, 1889
Aged
86 Y. 11 M. 14 D.

Mary Thompson
Wife of
John H. Thompson
Died
Feb. 3, 1880
Aged
72 Y. 11 M. 20 D.

Thompson Cemetery
Huntington County, IN

headstone

headstone

John Howard and Mary Thompson obits:

John's obit Mary's obit


Indiana Deaths, 1882-1920 (Ancestry.com):

Name: John H. Thompson
Date: 26 Oct 1889
Location: Warren
Age: 86 yr
Gender: Male
Race: White
Source Location: County Auditor Office, Huntington
Source Notes: The source of this record is the book A-2 on page 18 within the series produced by the Indiana Works Progress Administration.


Ebenezer (son of John and Dorcas) and Mary Thompson obits:

Ebenezer Thompson obit Mary Thompson obit


Elijah Thompson (son of John and Dorcas) obit and bio:

Elijah Thompson obit Elijah Thompson bio


George (son of John and Dorcas) and Lydia Thompson obits:

George Thompson obit Lydia Thompson obit


Margaret Thompson (daughter of John and Mary) obituary, August 1901:

Margaret Thompson obit Margaret's obit


Susan Shaffer (daughter of John and Mary) obit:

Susan Shaffer obit


Robert Thompson (son of John and Mary) obit and bio:

Robert Thompson obit Robert Thompson bio


Mary (daughter of John and Mary) and William Swaim obits:

Mary Swaim obit William Swaim obit


Nancy (daughter of John and Mary) and Lewis Mills obits:

Nancy Mills obit Lewis Mills obit

Census Records


1830 Census, Kentucky, Bracken County:

  John H Thompson 3 males 0-4, 1 male 5-9, 1 male 20-29, 1 female 20-29, 1 female 40-49


1840 Census, Kentucky, Bracken County:

  John H Thompson 1 male 0-4, 1 male 5-9, 2 males 10-14, 1 male 15-19, 1 male 30-39, 1 female 0-4, 1 female 5-9, 1 female 20-29


1850 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, District Fifty Two:

  John H Thompson age 48, male, farmer, $2000 real estate, born in KY
  Mary Thompson age 44, female, born in KY
  Margaret Thompson age 16, female, born in KY, attended school
  Susan Thompson age 15, female, born in KY, attended school
  Robert Thompson age 10, male, born in KY, attended school
  Mary Thompson age 8, female, born in IN, attended school
  James Thompson age 6, male, born in IN
  Anna Thompson age 2, female, born in IN
  Alford Thompson age 1, male, born in IN
  George Thompson age 22, male, farmer, $200 real estate, born in KY


1860 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, Salamonie Township:

  John H Thompson age 58, male, farmer, $6400 real estate, $1150 personal estate, born in KY
  Mary Thompson age 51, female, born in KY
  Margaret A Thompson age 23, female, born in KY
  Robert Thompson age 20, male, farm laborer, born in KY, attended school
  Mary Thompson age 18, female, born in IN, attended school
  James Thompson age 16, male, farm laborer, born in IN, attended school
  Nancy Thompson age 12, female, born in IN, attended school
  Alfred Thompson age 11, male, farm laborer, born in IN, attended school
  Joseph Seffler age 23, male, farm laborer, born in OH


1870 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, Salamonie Township:

  John Thompson age 67, male, farmer, $9700 real estate, $2855 personal estate, born in KY
  Mary Thompson age 61, female, keeping house, born in KY, cannot write
  Margaret Thompson age 35, female, born in KY
  Nancy Thompson age 23, female, born in IN
  Alfred Thompson age 21, male, farmer, $1200 real estate, $100 personal estate, born in IN


1880 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, Salamonie Township, Town of Warren:

  John H Thompson (living with Joseph Taylor's family, not related) age 77, widowed, "without any" occupation, born in KY
  Margaret Thompson (living with Joseph Taylor's family, not related) age 46, female, single, servant, born in KY, parents born in KY
  Mary Thompson age 74, female, married, born in KY (name crossed out and "dead" was written on her line)

Notes and Other Records


Proof of lineage notes:

  • 1822 marriage record shows John H Thompson married to Dorcas Elliott.
  • 1887 History of Huntington County, Indiana states that John Sr. married Dorcus Elliott and they had four sons: Ebenezer, Elijah, George, and Howard (John Jr.).
  • 1887 History of Huntington County, Indiana states that John H Thompson is son of John H Thompson, Sr.
  • 1889 obituary for John Howard Thompson, Sr. states that he married Dorcus Elliott and they had four sons: Ebenezer, Elijah, George S, and John H.
  • 1910 obituary for John Howard Thompson, Jr. states that he is son of John H. and Dorcas Thompson.
  • H.Brown and Sons Funeral Home records state that J.H.Thompson and Dorcas Elliott are the parents of John Howard Thompson.

U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 (Ancestry.com):
John H Thompson, Indiana, 2 Nov 1837, Huntington Co., Twp: 26-N, Range: 10-E, Sec: 13

land record


From History of Huntington County, 1914, page 521:

William Franklin Swaim

All too rapidly the ranks of those who took part in the great struggle between the North and the South are thinning. The gray-haired veterans, one after another, are going to join their comrades in that land where bloodshed and warfare are unknown. But few of the defenders of the Union flag during the sixties now remain who are able to hold their own in the keen struggle of everyday competition. Yet here and there are found exceptions, Now and then a sturdy old warrior is found whose eye is as bright and whose step is as firm as in the days of youth, and who, with intellect still unclouded finds enjoyment in a struggle in which he is pitted against the sons and grandsons of his former comrades. Although more than seventy years of age, William Franklin Swaim, of Huntington, veteran of the Civil War, and ex-official of Huntington county, continues to remain active in the management of his large affairs. He was born March 16, 1843, on the old home farm in Salamonie township, two miles east of the thriving town of Warren, Huntington county, Indiana, and is a son of the Rev. Samuel H. Swaim.

The ancestry of Mr. Swaim is traced back through many generations to the early settlement of Delaware and New Jersey by the Swedes and Finns, and later the family is found represented among the early pioneers of the historic old North State. From the most reliable information obtainable, the Swaims appear to have been descended from both the above nationalities, and the name is first found in the local annals of Delaware and New Jersey as far back as the year 1638. Samuel Hines Swaim, the father of William Franklin Swaim, was born October 25, 1820, in Randolph county, North Carolina. He was a youth of sixteen years of age when he accompanied the family to the wilds of what is now known as Salamonie township, Huntington county, Indiana. He became a man of education, a great reader and lover of books written by eminent authors and known as standard works, and part of his career was spent as a teacher, beginning in 1834 and continuing for the succeeding twenty years, during which lie gained a wide reputation in his calling. Reared a Baptist, he later joined the Methodist religion, became a widely-known minister, and was a great Bible student.

William Franklin Swaim passed his boyhood and youth in assisting his father on the home farm, his education being secured partly in the district schools, which he attended for about sixty days each winter, but principally under his father. The older man's preceptorship advanced the youth so rapidly that while still in his minority he secured a license to teach, although his work in the schoolroom w as interrupted by the war. In December, 1863, he laid aside the cap and gown to take up the musket, enlisting in Company D, One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and remained at Kokomo until the ensuing March, when it was ordered to join Sherman's army in Georgia. This regiment was assigned to the, Second Brigade, First Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, under General Schofield, being the flanking corps during the celebrated Atlanta campaign, and as such participated in many of the stirring scenes which marked that eventful service during the great War of the Rebellion. On July 22, 1864, while engaged before Atlanta, Mr. Swaim was taken sick, which necessitated his removal from the front to the field hospital, and later the character of his indisposition made it imperative to remove him to Knoxville, where better treatment could be obtained. On September 20, 1864, he left the hospital upon furlough and until the December following recuperated his strength under the care of relatives and friends at home. Rejoining his regiment at Nashville, he took part in the bloody battle at that place, after which he accompanied his command in pursuit of General Hood to the Tennessee river. Later, his regiment embarked on the Tennessee and made its way down that river and up the Ohio to Cincinnati, where it took train for the, national capital. After spending a month in Washington the command proceeded by water from Alexandria to North Carolina, landing at the mouth of Cape Fear river, from whence it was ordered to Forts Anderson and Beaufort. After a short stay at the latter place, an order came to proceed to Newbern, North Carolina, from which place the regiment, with others, made a long and tiresome march across cypress swamps and badly broken country to Goldsboro, taking part in the battle of Kingston on the way. Joining Sherman, they went to Raleigh, thence to Greensboro, and there Mr. Swaim witnessed the surrender of General Johnson, an event which broke the backbone of the Confederacy in that part of the South. For some time thereafter the regiment did guard duty at Charlotte, North Carolina and in August, 1865, a part of the regiment was ordered to Lincolnton, where it remained until November following. In September, 1865, Mr. Swaim was detailed to serve as clerk to the captain of his company, who was inspector general of the District of West-North Carolina, in which capacity he continued until mustered out of the service at Charlotte, North Carolina, December 2, 1865. Eleven days later he was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, Indiana, after which he returned to his home and once more took up the peaceful pursuits of civil life.

Mr. Swaim operated his father's farm during the two years that followed his leaving the army, and then embarked upon a career of his own by the purchase of eighty acres of good land. He continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits from 1868 to 1881, and at intervals also worked at the carpenter's trade. Upon disposing of his farming interests, he moved to Warren, and there, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Franklin Shaffer, he operated a planing mill for a period of four years. Subsequently he left this business to take up teaming and also interested himself in various other lines of endeavor. In 1889 he was elected a member of the board of trustees of Warren, and three years later had the honor of being chosen town treasurer, the duties of which position he discharged conscientiously and faithfully for two terms. In May, 1894, Mr. Swaim became the Republican nominee for county auditor, to which office he was elected after a strenuous campaign, with the handsome majority of 403 votes. As in his army life, in his official career Mr. Swaim showed himself true to every duty reposed in him, and through his courtesy won friends throughout the county. Although he retired from the activities of life upon the expiration of his official career, he has continued to look after his business interests, in the management of which he has shown keen discernment, foresight and acumen.

Mr. Swaim was married February 21, 1867, to Miss Mary Thompson, who was born in Salamonie township, Huntington county, Indiana, November 20, 1841. She is the daughter of John H., who was born November 12, 1802, and Mary (Thompson) Thompson, who was born February 14, 1807, both parents natives of Kentucky, from whence they came to Huntington county, Indiana, in the autumn of 1840. John Howard Thompson was one of the prosperous farmers and representative citizens of Huntington county, a man of unimpeachable honor and integrity and a leader in all moral and material movements for the well-being of the community. He followed farming until the year 1870, when he disposed of his property and made removal to the town of Warren, there continuing his residence until his death, October 26, 1889. Mrs. Thompson preceded him to the grave, passing away February 3, 1880. They were devout members of the Christian church and were known as kindly, charitable people. One child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Swaim: Alfred Edward, September 16, 1868. He was married September 1, 1889, to Miss Amelia M. Irwin, and they had one daughter, Edith Marie, who was born November 8, 1890. Alfred Edward Swaim was his father's deputy while he occupied the county auditor's office, and later became assistant cashier of the Citizens State Bank of Huntington.

Mr. Swaim has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church since March, 1857. He exemplifies his faith in his daily life and conversation, takes an active interest in the affairs of the local congregation with which he is identified, and is foremost in all movements having for their object the advancement of education, morality, good citizenship and the public welfare. His fraternal connection is with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he also likes to foregather with his old comrades in James R. Slack Post No. 137, Grand Army of the Republic, of which he has been Adjutant for the last six years.


From Huntington County, Indiana History and Families 1834-1993 page 388-389:

Ebenezer Thompson III

Ebenezer, son of John Howard and Dorcas [Elliott] Thompson, was born in Bracken County, KY on June 22, 1823. He was married to Permelia Blair March 4, 1845. To them were born two children, John Howard and Mary Jane. The mother of these two children died Sept. 23, 1849. He then married Mary Anne Richards, the daughter of Lewis and Elizabeth Richards. She was born in Preble County, OH, Nov. 2, 1825. When she was eight years old, she moved with her parents to Indiana and settled on the Salamonie River when there were but few white families here. Ebenezer and Mary Anne become the parents of eight children: Ezra C., George H., Lewis E., Lucretia, Byron E., Permelia Anne, James, and Dorcas Alice. The family spent most of their years on a 160 acre farm of the southwest quarter of Section 13. Ebenezer later acquired 100 acres of the southeast quarter, all of which was later owned by his son Byron. Later the 100 acres was owned by Byron's son, Samuel H. Death came to Ebenezer on Dec. 8, 1896 after he had been at work and had put his mule team in the stable. His daughter, Lucretia, concerned that he had not come in for dinner went to see about him and found him lying dead beside one of the mules. The cause of death was determined to be heart disease since he had had several attacks. Funeral services were held at the Zion Church, conducted by Dr. James Maple and interment in the Thompson Cemetery.


The Warren Weekly News, February 18, 1887:

THOMPSON.-- George S. Thompson died at his home, about four miles northeast of town, February 10, 1887, aged 59 years, 1 month and 5 days.

His death was caused by measles, which also terminated the existence of his daughter, Alice, on Sunday following. The latter was aged about fifteen years. Mr. Thompson was an excellent citizen and neighbor. He was the soul of honesty, a man of the strictest integrity, with a noble heart and a true nature. In his death the community sustains a great loss, his wife a good husband,and his children a kind father.

Sources and Credits


  • Thompson Family History, 1st edition, 1941. Work by: Fred E. Swaim, Monroe Wiley, Ellen E. (Thompson) Huffman, Elza Thompson and Dorotha (Jones) Thompson.
  • Thompson Family History, 2nd edition, 1978. Work by: Richard Thompson, Ward and Ruby (Thompson) Irick, Charles and Mary (Thompson) Dungan, and Doris (Thompson) Knuckles.
  • Thompson Family History, 3rd edition, 2002. Work by: Richard Thompson, Mrs. Robert B. (Ruth) Falk, Nellie Stinson Sleppy, and Mary Esther Thompson Dungan. Special tribute to: Fred Swaim, Dorothy (Thompson) Mayhugh, and Fel Brunnet
  • History of Huntington County, Indiana, 1887.
  • Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County, 1901.
  • History of Huntington County, Indiana, 1914.
  • Bracken County, Kentucky marriage record, book 1, p. 127.
  • Bracken County, Kentucky marriage record, book 1, p. 129.
  • 1830 Census, Kentucky, Bracken County.
  • 1840 Census, Kentucky, Bracken County.
  • 1850 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, District Fifty Two.
  • 1860 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, Salamonie Township.
  • 1870 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, Salamonie Township.
  • 1880 Census, Indiana, Huntington County, Salamonie Township.
  • John Howard Thompson, Sr. obituary, October 1889.
  • Mary Thompson obituary, February 1880.
  • Indiana Deaths, 1882-1920 (Ancestry.com).
  • U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 (Ancestry.com).
  • Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850: (Ancestry.com).
  • John Howard Thompson, Jr. obituary, March 1910.
  • H. Brown and Sons Funeral Home Records.
  • Huntington County, Indiana History & Families 1834-1993.
  • Headstone photos by Tom.
  • Family trees at Ancestry.com.
  • 1822 Bracken Co., KY marriage record for John H Thompson and Dorcas Elliott from FamilySearch.org.